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New Resources In The Library

Education

Those Who Can, Teach: teaching as Christian vocation

For many aspiring academics, the transition from doctoral student to classroom teacher is a challenging one. The classroom culture, the needed pedagogical skills, and the expected level and type of work are significantly different in the two environments. Nevertheless, most doctoral students go on to teach in undergraduate or seminary classrooms. To prepare the PhD students at McMaster Divinity College to negotiate this transition successfully, the faculty holds a biennial colloquium covering the major dimensions, both theoretical and practical, of a Christian teaching vocation. On the basis of the presentations of the colloquium, the essential topics have been addressed in essays prepared for this volume for the benefit of all who aspire to excellence in their teaching, especially those in Christian higher education.

Bringing Montessori to America: S. S. McClure, Maria Montessori, and the Campaign to Publicize Montessori Education

Bringing Montessori to America traces in engrossing detail one of the most fascinating partnerships int he history of American education - that between Maria Montessori and S.S. McClure, from their first meeting in 1910 until their final acrimonious dispute in 1915.

 

The Neuroscience of Learning and Development

This book harnesses what we have learned from innovations in teaching, from neuroscience, experiential learning, and studies on mindfulness and personal development to transform how we deliver and create new knowledge, and indeed transform our students, developing their capacities for adaptive boundary spanning.
 

McKeachie's Teaching Tips

This indispensable handbook provides helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday challenges of university teaching and those that arise in efforts to maximize learning for every student. The suggested strategies are supported by research and adaptable to specific classroom situations. Rather than suggest a "set of recipes" to be followed mechanically, the book gives instructors the tools they need to deal with the ever-changing dynamics of teaching and learning.

Case Studies on Safety, Bullying, and Social Media in Schools

Case Studies on Safety, Bullying, and Social Media in Schools addresses the most topical issues facing school leaders today―including bullying, harassment, inappropriate use of social media, drug use, and school safety. This case book helps aspiring educational leaders prepare and respond to even the most difficult situations that occur on school campuses and in the school community. Bridging theory and practice, each chapter includes a detailed case, artifacts for analysis, explanation of relevant case and federal law, and guiding questions for discussion. Adapted from real-world examples, the case studies in this timely resource serve as essential exercises for aspiring and practicing leaders to ensure student safety and success.

Judicious Discipline

This volume discusses the theory and practice of Judicious Discipline, a learner-centered approach consistent with developing self-responsibility in students, appropriate for both elementary and secondary classrooms. The book is used in many teacher education programs and in K-12 professional development workshops.

 

Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids' Brains and What Schools Can Do About It

In Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids' Brains and What Schools Can Do About It, veteran educator and brain expert Eric Jensen takes an unflinching look at how poverty hurts children, families, and communities across the United States and demonstrates how schools can improve the academic achievement and life readiness of economically disadvantaged students.

Boys in Poverty: Framework for Understanding Dropout

Boys in Poverty examines the relationship between poverty and dropout among males by examining a wide range of risk factors, including the absence of role models; the trauma of violence and abuse; peer pressures; issues of belonging and not belonging; culturally driven expectations that boys should work rather than finish school, and cognitive and developmental issues that affect boys learning. In addition, the authors look at community and school system factors, such as poor teachers, unfair or punitive discipline policies, and the absence of differentiated instruction. The book structures these issues into four strands, or categories, of development physical, emotional, cognitive, and social, examining how each is exacerbated by poverty. Additional chapters explore the special problems of sensitive, gay, gifted, and ADHD boys and issues of post-adolescent males beyond high school age. Within each of these areas of development, the authors offer concrete suggestions for keeping boys engaged with school and the learning process.

The Flat World and Education: how America's commitment to equity will determine our future

In this bestseller and Grawemeyer Award winner, Linda Darling-Hammond offers an eye-opening wake-up call concerning America’s future and vividly illustrates what the United States needs to do in order to build a system of high-achieving and equitable schools that ensures every child the right to learn.

Cracks in the School Yard: Confronting Latino Educational Inequality

In Cracks in the Schoolyard, Conchas challenges deficit models of schooling and turns school failure on its head. Going beyond presenting critical case studies of social inequality and education, this book features achievement cases that depict Latinos as active actors―not hopeless victims― in the quest for social and economic mobility. Chapters examine the ways in which college students, high school youth, English language learners, immigrant Latino parents, queer homeless youth, the children of Mexican undocumented immigrants, and undocumented immigrant youth all work in local settings to improve their quality of life and advocate for their families and communities. Taken together, these counternarratives will help educators and policymakers fill the cracks in the schoolyard that often create disparity and failure for youth and young adults.

We're in This Together: Public-Private Partnerships in Special and At-Risk-Education

We’re In This Together: Public-Private Partnerships in Special and At-Risk-Education is a timely book that explores the use by public schools of private education companies to meet the needs of some of the nation’s most challenged and challenging students. The book examines variations of use by states as well as the cultural attitudes toward the private sector to address these core functions of public schooling. The book offers grounded and thought provoking perspectives on: the legal framework of PL94-142 and its successor IDEA; the disconnect between the needs of young children with autism and public school special education services; and the significant size of the at-risk population and the shortcomings of efforts to serve those students. 

Music for All: teaching music to people with special needs

This book is designed to teach music to people with special needs. Many of the activities and suggestions in this book could as easily come under the heading of recreational music, that is, the use of music for sheer enjoyment. For people with special needs, recreational music is tremendously important and can provide a safe place for the development of social skills, the release of emotions, and the satisfaction that comes from making music with others. Chapters cover dealing with specific disabilities and include activities that will facilitate the teaching of students who have these problems, "Books, Records, and Tapes" gives suggestions for further sources of information, and a section of addresses of various organizations provides places to obtain materials.

A Reflective Practitioner's Guide to (Mis)Adventures in Drama Education

This collection of essays from many of the world’s pre-eminent drama education practitioners captures the challenges and struggles of teaching with honesty, humour, openness, and integrity. Collectively the authors possess some two hundred years of shared experience in the field, and each essay investigates the mistakes of best-intentions, the lack of awareness, and the omissions that pock all of our careers. The authors ask, and answer quite honestly, a series of difficult and reflexive questions: What obscured our understanding of our students’ needs in a particular moment? What drove our professional expectations?